Serious Movie Lover

Portrait of a Marriage (Physics on the Side)

By / Wednesday, December 3, 2014 / Category: Review / No comments

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING (2014/IN THEATERS) theory  It’s difficult to portray genius in film—remember Russell Crowe in “A Beautiful Mind?”  So how about tackling genius combined with severe physical malady, like the horrific “motor neuron disorder” that struck Stephen Hawking when he was a young 20-something?  A tough combo for sure, but one that Eddie Redmayne has pulled off perfectly, all the while adding that little “twinkle in the eye” and crooked sweet smile that we associate with the real Hawking.  Moviegoers, however, should not be confused about this film.  It is NOT an explanation of Hawking’s extraordinary genius but rather the story of his first marriage to Jane Wilde, whom he met when they were both students at Cambridge University before his illness began.  Married in 1965, the two remained together until 1990 and produced three children–certainly a surprising fact to those of us who knew very little of Hawking’s personal life.  (BTW:  Thankfully, the movie offers a short biological explanation of how a man who is almost completely paralyzed can achieve fatherhood.)  The movie is based on Jane’s book, “Travelling to Infinity: My Life with Stephen,” and is largely told from her point of view, starting with her first meeting with Stephen at a party on campus.  Over the course of the film, we witness their 25 years together—complete with ups and incredible downs, mostly based on Stephen’s continuing deterioration.  Both parties are presented well and appear strong in the face of adversity.  Jane (played by Felicity Jones) famously brings Jonathan Hellyer Jones (Charlie Cox), the Choir Director at her church, into the family to help with the children and with Stephen.  She and Jones develop an “arms-length” romance but, at least in this movie, wait to fulfill their love for one another until she and Stephen officially divorce (in 1995).   By that time, Stephen has taken up with his nurse Elaine Mason (Maxine Peake) who is shown as totally devoted to him in the film (in real life, she was accused of being physically abusive).   Scenes showing Hawking racing after his children in his motorized wheelchair and trying out his new voice synthesizer (with that very familiar Hawking voice) are truly charming and serve to remind us even more of how much he has overcome.  What we’re meant to also appreciate is the level of effort Jane contributed to their semblance of a normal life.  As the film nears its end, we see Hawking with the Queen and the two now-separated companions admiring their teenage children.  Very sweet and worth the viewing for anyone who wants to learn more about these two lives.

 

Grade:  B+

 

 

 

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Boldly Going Where Few Have Gone

By / Monday, November 17, 2014 / Category: Rebecca's Favorites, Uncategorized / No comments

INTERSTELLAR (2014/IN THEATERS)   

What to say about Christopher Nolan‘s eagerly awaited sci-fi/mind-bender of a flick?  I have one word:

interstellarLONG!  169 minutes in fact–that’s almost 3 hours–and it certainly feels that way.  I found myself checking my watch at the 60 minute mark and thought seriously about walking out half-way through.  Sure enough, though, the final 45 minutes or so did bring a series of crazy twists that made me glad I stayed.  As I’m sure you already know, the plot revolves around our dying Earth, full of dust storms and failing crops, and the clandestine effort to find a new planet to escape to.  The hero of the piece is Cooper (Matthew McConaughey, in full drawl), a former space pilot now consigned to be a farmer.  He’s a widow who is very close to his two children and lives with his father-in-law (John Lithgow) in a typical “needs a paint job” midwestern looking farmhouse.  Thanks to a series of events and particularly because of his young daughter Murph (Mackenzie Foy as a young girl, Jessica Chastain as the grown-up version), Cooper discovers that NASA, in secret and led by none other than Michael Caine (as Dr. Brand), has sent out explorers to find a new host planet and needs his skills to chase down the most promising ones.  The mission inspires Cooper and he agrees to help, in effect leaving his children behind on a dying planet.  He’s joined on the mission by Brand’s daughter (Anne Hathaway) as well as two other scientists and a couple computer “droids”, one of whom is intended to bring a few comic chuckles to a movie that offers little relief.  All of this set-up eats up about 1/3 of the movie but soon we’re headed off in the space ship, through a “worm hole” in pursuit of phantom signals from three sites on the other side.  I’ll stop here with any further description because frankly, there’s way too much to cover and you’ll want to see it all for yourself.  Suffice it to say, that there are plenty of twists and turns, most of them bad.  And there’s also plenty of pathos (too much for my taste really) and way too much loud and intrusive music from Hans Zimmer (who scored the movie), always signaling to us that SOMETHING IMPORTANT is happening.    We get it, Mr. Nolan.  The film really has moments that are awesome, but on the whole, I think it would have benefitted from some tight editing.

 

Grade:   B-

 

P.S.  Will I run out to see this film again? Not on your life, but AMC is now selling an “All You Want” unlimited ticket option for those who can’t enough of it. And it’s doing just fine at the box office, especially overseas.

 

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Birdman Belongs in a League By Itself

By / Sunday, November 2, 2014 / Category: Review / No comments

BIRDMAN (2014/IN THEATERS)  birdman It’s difficult to characterize this movie—darkly comedic, with laugh-out-loud moments, yet real pathos, combined with bravura performances from every cast member, a blow out “score” alternating gorgeous classical pieces with jazz drumming, and over-the-top creative camera-work by Emmanuel Lubezki—all to deliver writer/director Alejandro González Iñárritu‘s portrait of “Birdman” Michael Keaton‘s Riggan Thomson.  Riggan is a has-been film actor who has set out to rise above his failed movie career and honor the serious side of his craft with a Broadway play he has written, produced and stars in.  The name of the play is “What We Talk About When We Talk About Love” and the title is just as meaningful to the movie as you might expect.  Riggan is trying to restore not just his pride of purpose as an actor but also his relationship with his daughter which is a mess.  You’ll find yourself rooting hard for Riggan and one of the main reasons is that Michael Keaton is so unbelievably good in this role.  It’s hard to think of another actor who could pull it off.  But while Keaton is the centerpiece of the film, those around him are equally talented and wonderful.  Edward Norton is Mike, the self-assured stage actor “stealing” Riggan’s play.  Emma Stone is Riggan’s recovering addict daughter Sam, vulnerable and angry but loving in her way.  Zack Galifianakis is perfect as Riggan’s beset lawyer who is trying to hold everything together financially and otherwise.  And that’s not all–we also get  Naomi Watts as Mike’s lover and Riggan’s co-star, in her first big Broadway break, Amy Ryan as Riggan’s ex and Sam’s mother, and Andrea Riseborough as Riggan’s current love interest (and co-star).   There are wild scenes–I’m sure you’ve seen some of them in the previews.  But it all works and beautifully to bring our hero “Birdman” to wildly crazy life.  Whatever you do, don’t miss this one.

 

Grade:   A

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For Fans of Patricia Highsmith and Old Style Thrillers

By / Tuesday, October 21, 2014 / Category: Review / No comments

THE TWO FACES OF JANUARY (2014/IN SELECT THEATERS)    two faces

First-time director and screenwriter Hossein Amini is no stranger to great cinema—he wrote the screenplays for Drive and Wings of the Dove, among many others—and while in this film he has taken a few liberties with Patricia Highsmith’s 1964 novel of the same name, the result is just fine IMHO.  For one thing, the cast of this three-handed thriller is top notch.   Set in 1962, we first meet Chester MacFarland, a handsome older con man (Viggo Mortensen, looking chiseled and tanned), who is accompanied by his beautiful younger wife, Collette (Kirsten Dunst), while touring the Grecian ruins in Athens as part of their grand sweep of Europe.  They make a striking couple and attract the attention of a small time, younger con man, Rydal Keener (Oscar Isaac of Llewyn Davis fame), who presents himself as a useful tour guide.

Chester’s smooth cover is blown soon in the film when he is confronted with a Private Detective, gun in hand, who is looking to recover funds for mob-related clients back in the States.  Rydal, attracted to Collette, is drawn into the couple’s desperate need to escape.  He helps them arrange fake passports and takes them to Crete, where they can all theoretically disappear for a few days while the documents are being created.  Of course, three-ways never work, and when there are two men and one beautiful woman, the audience can already predict a bad outcome.

The original book cover from 1964.

The original book cover from 1964.

But this story is not a simple love-triangle—nothing from Ms. Highsmith is ever simple.  For those who aren’t familiar with her work, she is the creator of The Talented Mr. Ripley and you’ll certainly notice similarities between this film and the Ripley series.  As with those movies, the hot, sun-soaked Mediterrean plays a major role in the film, while running themes of father/son relationships lie just one level below the action.   I won’t say more to spoil the film but I will say this–I am a fan of old-style thrillers and while this movie has not gotten the best reviews all around, it did not disappoint me one bit.  Granted some plot points are a bit of a stretch and the pacing can seem very slow.  But this is part of the build-up.  The acting, particularly from the two men, is top notch.  My favorite scene includes not a single line of dialog and no action whatsoever, as they sit opposite one another at a table.  All that needs to be said is carried in their faces and particularly in their eyes.  And while some reviewers have disliked the ending, I found it spot-on.

Grade:  A-

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Fincher’s Gone Girl Is “True to the Book” Thriller

By / Saturday, October 4, 2014 / Category: Review / 2 comments

GONE GIRL (2014/IN THEATERS) gone girl Talk about buzz!  The screen version of Gillian Flynn‘s 2012 bestselling thriller has been in the news since the moment the rights were sold to Reese Witherspoon back in 2011 based on the manuscript alone.  And reports in 2012 listed Witherspoon as the expected star in the leading role of “Amazing Amy,” the whip-smart blonde wife of masculine lead Nick Dunne, whose disappearance starts the chain of events that make up the entire plotline here.  It was easy to picture Witherspoon in the role, but in January 2013, David Fincher joined as director, and Rosamund Pike was announced as Amy with Ben Affleck as Nick. These two leads (as anyone who has read the book knows) must not only carry this film, they must succeed in confusing us in the audience — about their motives, their truthfulness, what they’ve done and what they haven’t done, as well as everything else in between—otherwise, the story doesn’t work.  Flynn herself crafted the screenplay, preserving the “he said,” “she said,” structure of her book straight into the film, with Nick giving a spoken narration of events and Amy’s perspective coming from her diary.  I’m assuming anyone reading this review is familiar with the plot, but just in case, here’s a quick rundown:  on the morning of his 5th anniversary, Nick leaves his bar in the small Missouri town of New Carthage, to find that his wife has disappeared, with evidence pointing to kidnapping or worse.  Over time, Nick becomes the prime suspect of murder and many pieces of circumstantial evidence point in his direction.  Meanwhile, we meet his NY wife, Amy, who has served as the model for her parents’ successful book series entitled “Amazing Amy,” and we learn as she writes/reads her diary of how her model marriage has fallen desperately apart.

 

This is on the 10th film for David Fincher.

This is only the 10th film for David Fincher.

Although I’ve always liked him, Affleck is often understated and even “leaden” as an actor.  Here his style works to his advantage—we honestly can’t tell if he’s lying or just plain stupid.  Rosamund Pike is a drop dead gorgeous British actress with a slew of wonderful roles behind her (An Education, Pride and Prejudice, Barney’s Version, just to name three of my favorites!).  She has a very smooth exterior which serves the role of Amy well.  The movie is tight and the supporting roles are on target as well, especially (of all people) Tyler Perry, who is just plain fabulous as the slick lawyer who comes to help Nick as he’s floundering in today’s media madness.  And of course, that’s the other “leading role” in the film—today’s media.  Famously, Gillian Flynn was a writer who was fired by Entertainment Weekly during the downturn.  She spent three years on her novel which skewers the media perfectly.  Fincher has certainly made that part of the film come alive just as solidly as his two main characters.  My overall take:  Good film.  Great adaptation.  Don’t miss it.

 

Grade:  A

 

 

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Sweaters, Boots & New Movies! SML Looks Forward to Fall

By / Friday, September 5, 2014 / Category: On Our Radar / No comments

043396115163Like any recent college graduates (no follow-up questions, please), your Serious Movie Lovers still get that giddy anticipatory feeling when Fall arrives. New school supplies! Fresh seasons of our favorite TV shows! And a slew of new movies. Here are a few that we can’t wait to talk about.

Kim sez:

1. The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby: Jessica Chastain might be my favorite film actress right now–her performances in Take Shelter, The Tree of Life, and even Mama were all so distinctly memorable. (Also, she has a three-legged dog! Living my dream!) It’s unclear to me if this is going to be released in the original “his and hers” versions or just as one Harvey Weinstein-approved combo–either way, I’m in.

2. Whiplash: Ever since Rabbit Hole, I’ve been waiting for Miles Teller to really break out–he was, no kidding, so good in the Footloose remake! Charm for days. And his performance in The Spectacular Now should have made him a major teen heartthrob (That wiener Ansel Elgort? No thank you). There are rumblings that his work in Whiplash (as a jazz drummer mentored/abused by the always fantastic J.K. Simmons) might do the trick.

3. Foxcatcher: It’s my dirty little secret that I find true crime fascinating. Coming across a copy of “Helter Skelter” at a friend’s house helped shape me into the weirdo I am today. And while this du Pont guy doesn’t seem as intriguing/crazy as Robert Durst (see All Good Things) or most of the small-town murderous ladies on “Snapped,” I am looking forward to seeing Steve Carell and Channing “Tater” Tatum act without utilizing a single goofy face or skilled dance move, respectively.

And add to that, Becky’s top two:

1.  Birdman:  I cannot wait to see Michael Keaton back in action with the added bonus of Edward Norton (have you seen him wrestling with Keaton in his underwear?! in the trailer—so fabulous!)

2.  Gone Girl:  For David Fincher alone really.  The man is so damned talented, let’s see what he can do with it.

SML Readers:  Add more in our comments section!  What’s got you excited for fall??

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Looking for More Magic in Woody Allen’s Latest

By / Tuesday, August 26, 2014 / Category: Review / No comments

MAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT (2014/IN THEATERS)  magic Moviegoers seem to be taking something of a pass on Woody Allen’s latest film–his 49th, depending on your counting method.  Certainly the critics have given it mixed reviews, awarding the movie a Rotten Tomatoes rating of only 48%.  The story is relatively simple:  Stanley Crawford (Colin Firth) is a world-famous magician who goes by the stage name of Wei Ling Soo.  He is invited by his former classmate, friend and fellow magician, Howard Burkan (Simon McBurney), to come to the Cote d’Azur to help debunk a young American mystic (Emma Stone ) who has captivated a wealthy family there.   Stanley is quick to take up the offer, as he sees an opportunity to visit his favorite relative, Aunt Vanessa (Eileen Atkins), and to also add to his reputation as a “man of science” who will unmask this young pretender.  Once in France, we the audience are treated to some spectacular sets and scenery—thanks to the gorgeous cinematography of Darius Khondji who also shot “Midnight in Paris” and “To Rome with Love,” as well as many others.  Filming took place in several fantastic venues, among them Villa Eilenroc, in Cap d’Antibes, and at the Villa la Renardière, in Mouans-Sartoux.  The costumes are also to die for.  Did I mention that this is a period piece?  It’s set in the 1920’s and while that adds some charm, perhaps it’s also part of the problem.  The movie feels a bit “stodgy”–with awkward dialogue, some jumpy cutting between scenes, and a really slow start.  Nonetheless, the last third of the movie is really fun and you certainly will enjoy several wonderful performances throughout, not the least of which is Colin Firth’s, as he moves his character 180 degrees and back.  My personal favorites in the film are Eileen Atkins as the worldly and wise Aunt Vanessa, and Jacki Weaver as the wealthy matriarch of the piece, who is happy to hear that her dead husband was “faithful” to her.   But what about Emma Stone, you’re wondering….she’s always so good.  Let’s just say that she plays her part quite well (as always) but you could wish for a little more “magic” on screen.  Ultimately, I found the movie to be classical “mid-level” Woody Allen, bringing to mind something like “You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger.”   Maybe a great choice for your end of summer matinee treat!

 

Grade:   B

 

catch  P.S.  Darius Khondji shot on 35-mm. film, with old CinemaScope lenses, to achieve a noticeably soft, lemon-tinted light that evokes “To Catch a Thief“…..and that’s not all……at one point Firth and Stone drive along the Riviera in a red Alfa Romeo, in essence repeating the exact drive Cary Grant and Grace Kelly made 60 years ago :-)  Now there’s a film with real magic!

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Every Bit As Good As You’ve Heard

By / Tuesday, August 19, 2014 / Category: Review / 1 comment

BOYHOOD (IN THEATERS/2014) boyhood  This film from Richard Linklater (Writer/Director) has been called “ground breaking” because he shot it over 12 continuous years (3-4 days at a time) with the same actors, showing us a real boy and all his changes, as well as his family’s, over those years.   Mind you, this is not a documentary–it’s fiction.  These people you come to know so well on screen are actors (although young Ellar Coltrane, who plays the main character Mason Jr., was only 6 when he started and an unknown) who remarkably didn’t sign contracts and agreed to show up every year for 12 years for this fabulous director.  Even if you’ve read the reviews, it’s hard to know quite what to expect as you’re walking into the theater.  What will this be like?  How will it move over those 12 years?  What’s going to happen?   First off, let’s just say that my friend and fellow SML Reviewer Be and I were surprised to learn that the film is 2 hours and 45 minutes long.  BUT, those minutes literally flew by as we were completely sucked into the story of Mason, and his well meaning parents (played so beautifully by Patricia Arquette and Ethan Hawke) as well as his sometimes incredibly overbearing sister Samantha (the director’s daughter Lorelei Linklater).  The time shifts are smooth and feel natural–the audience follows perfectly as life moves on and changes.  Mason transforms right in front of our eyes from a dreamy kid into a geeky/slightly rebellious teenager and finally into a handsome young man heading off to college and surely a good future.  I won’t write more about the film because I would want any SML reader to experience it directly.  But my advice is this:  run right out and see this movie.  It couldn’t be better.

 

Grade:     A

 

P.S.  Didn’t realize it, but the 1968 GTO driven in the movie belongs to Linklater himself!

 

 

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A Moving Tribute for The Movies’ Hero

By / Sunday, August 3, 2014 / Category: Review / 1 comment

LIFE ITSELFLIFE ITSELF (2014/IN THEATERS) One thing I learned while watching Life Itself, Steve James’ beautiful and moving documentary about the life, career, and death of SML Hero #1 Roger Ebert, is that Roger didn’t believe in spending longer than 30 minutes to write a review. Inspired by this fact, I gave myself the same deadline. We’ll see if I end up with a piece of writing worthy of a Pulitzer. Life Itself (also the title of Roger’s 2011 memoir, a must-read) covers pieces of Rogers life, from his childhood in Urbana, Illinois, through his beginnings as a newspaperman, his introduction to film criticism by happenstance (the paper’s other film critic quit, so they just moved Roger into the role), his industry-defining career reviewing movies on television, and his massive Web presence in the final years of his life. James interviewed Roger’s friends and colleagues, his fellow critics (those inspired by him and those in competition with him), film makers he championed and supported, and his family. I was most touched by the honest and emotional interviews given by Chaz Ebert, who married Roger later in his life and was his loving and fiercely devoted partner and who continues to expand his legacy. The film is narrated in part by a voice-imitator doing an eerily spot-on imitation of Roger’s voice; a lovely touch that was so subtle it didn’t immediately occur to me that Roger couldn’t have possibly narrated any part of the film, having lost his voice to cancer in 2006. James was chosen by Roger himself, due to the latter’s love of James’ Hoop Dreams documentary, and was given access to all areas of his subjects’ life. The unflinching footage of Roger’s physical condition and his death are handled with admirable honesty, a detail Roger insisted upon. Your SML correspondents have always felt like we knew Roger personally, having visited his film festival several years and following him nearly all of our movie-going lives. Fans of his will feel the weight of this tribute in your hearts, like we do. It is wonderful and so very sad, and it could have been 10 times longer and still not included everything Roger did or everyone he touched. It is always intimidating to write about Roger Ebert because he was such a prolific and intelligent writer. His was always the first review I read after seeing a movie, and I will always wonder, when I’ve seen something new, what he would have written about it. He would have liked this one, I think.

My 30 minutes are up so I’ll leave you with some links to more eloquent summaries:

Chaz and James talk about the film

NPR’s review

Film coverage on rogerebert.com

Grade: A

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Something Light for the Summer Movie Doldrums

By / Tuesday, July 22, 2014 / Category: Uncategorized / 1 comment

BEGIN AGAIN (2013/IN THEATERS) beginagain Here’s a definite B movie that actually plays pretty well, especially if you happen to like  and  (which I do).  The film is written and directed by , the Irishman whose first film, Once (2006), had a bit of magic in it—the story of two unlikely musicians who team up and fall in love, on screen and in real life, making great music together on the way by.  “Once” has gone on to Broadway, you know—and the couple is no more.  Ironically, Mr. Carney centers his new film on the whole topic of commercialism in the music world and an exploration of “true” music and musicians, basically telling the tale of two outcasts from the world of record labels who meet by chance in a bar and team up to “beat the system.”  Ruffalo plays Dan, a former wunderkind of indie record labels, who is kicked out by his own partner (played by Mos Def) from the company he helped create.  Knightley plays Gretta, the “true musician” of the piece who writes songs just to write them.  Cast as the definite sell-out in this flick is none other than  who plays Ms. Knightley’s boyfriend Dave, her lover and partner in music.  Gretta writes many of the songs Dave sings and the two appear completely devoted to one another.  As the movie opens, they are enroute to an apartment in NYC, part of a deal he has closed with a U.S. record label.  Soon, of course, he is whisked off to LA for a series of recording sessions, and upon his return, promptly dumps Gretta for someone else.  Luckily for our heroine, a good friend from the UK lives in the Big Apple and puts her up.  This is Steve, played by an adorable .  Steve just happens to also have a serious set-up for home-grown recording.  And so the plot thickens.  Dan hears the potential in Gretta’s music and sets up a series of street level recording sessions, all to produce something his former partner will want.  There are other characters as well—Dan’s daughter Violet () and his currently estranged wife Miriam (), as well as his long-time friend in the industry TroubleGum ().  I found the film to be engaging and fun, particularly during the street-level recording sessions.  And the cast is great.   But is the film memorable?  Not at all.  So, what is it exactly?  I’d say a light-hearted movie that’s trying to make a big point.  Enjoy it for what it is, if you go.  Or wait for the RedBox.  No problem.

 

Grade:   B

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